3D Masters draws rave reviews, more MSOs

Comcast wowed the crowd when it previewed what the Masters Tournament will look like in 3D TV, showing off test footage to reporters at the Sports New York studios on three different devices: a 3D-enabled laptop (and isn't that something you want when you're waiting for a plane in a crowded airport?), an LG passive 3D TV and a Sony active 3D TV. The differences between passive and active isn't about whether the sports being watched are fast moving or lackadaisical; it is about economics. Passive technology requires glasses that cost about $1.50; active glasses cost about $150. But don't get your hopes up--TV set makers this year are introducing active technology because passive technology is very expensive to include in TVs.

As for the broadcast, an observer from the New York Times reported that "Augusta provides an ideal laboratory to show golf in the third dimension. The course is gorgeous. It undulates. Its elevations change."

The beauty of it all must have gotten to other MSOs as well. Time Warner, Cablevision and Shaw Communications in Canada have all signed up to air the broadcasts to the handful of people in North America with active 3D TV sets and 3D TV spectacles.

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