3D TV shows big potential, big hassles, small market until 2015

Those attending next week's Cable Show in Los Angeles can expect to see a dizzying array of 3D TV demonstrations by equipment and programming vendors. They can expect to hear discussions of 3D TV--when the rumble over the FCC and broadcasters dies down--and they can expect to come away with the notion that 3D TV is just around the corner. If they believe the last part, though, they'll be mistaken, according to "Global 3D TV Forecasts," a report issued by Informa Telecoms & Media. Yes, the report says, 3D TV will happen but no, it won't happen overnight. "The market will still be very immature by 2015," said Simon Murray, principal analyst at Informa and the report's author.

The biggest drawback to 3D TV, the report says, is a lack of a glasses-free system. Other factors include no content (that's a big one), high production costs, no or at least few 3D channels, bandwidth constraints and the high cost of 3D TVs.

All this negativity hasn't discouraged Numericable from building an HD 3D VoD (now there's a bunch of initials that could send you screaming to your search engine). Cisco will be providing the content delivery platform to make the ambitious effort happen, the two companies said.

For more:
- see this story
- and this blog post about Numericable

Related articles:
Price, goofy glasses hold up 3D TV adoption in U.K.
Amid hoopla, Comcast exec urges 3D TV caution

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