Aereo will launch in Atlanta in June

Aereo, the online video streaming service that allows subscribers to rent remote antennas to receive over-the-air TV programming, will launch in Atlanta in June.

The Atlanta market will be the third to offer Aereo's technology, after the New York metropolitan area and Boston. Aereo will launch in Boston Wednesday.

Pre-registered customers in Atlanta will receive Aereo service June 17. One week later, all eligible consumers in the Atlanta area will be able to sign up for the service.

Aereo CEO and founder Chet Kanojia touted his company's use of the antenna combined with cloud-based DVR storage technology as a unique way to enable viewers to watch and store over-the-air broadcasting.

"It's clear that consumers want more choice and flexibility in how they watch television and they don't want to be fenced into expensive, out dated technology," Kanojia said in a prepared statement. "Aereo's antenna/DVR technology brings the old-fashioned antenna into the 21st Century."

The Atlanta market has a range of 27 over-the-air broadcast channels that will be available to Aereo subscribers, including Fox, NBC and CBS affiliates as well as several major Spanish-language broadcast channels such as Univision and MundoFox.

Although Kanojia maintained that Aereo has seen a "phenomenal" response from consumers, the company still faces legal threats from major broadcasters.  CBS chief Les Moonves, for example, has said his company will sue Aereo if it continues with its expansion plans in Boston, and such a move would be possible in Atlanta as well.

For more:
- see the press release

Related articles:
Aereo drops daily and annual subscription options ahead of Boston launch
Aereo sues CBS in advance of Boston launch
Diller says Aereo is no legal loophole
Fox, CBS ask appeals court to rehear Aereo case

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