Arris gets regulatory sign-off from Brazil; Comcast Ventures backs another VR start-up

More cable news from across the Web:

> Arris said it has received preliminary approval from Brazil for its $2.1 billion purchase of Pace, putting the merger on track to close in January. Press release

> Comcast Ventures has invested in another virtual reality start-up, leading a $6 million funding round for Beobab Studios. Deadline Hollywood story

> Comcast will provide the blind and visually impaired a special narration track during the presentation of NBC's The Wiz Live! Multichannel News story

> Sling TV has rolled out the first phase of an interface upgrade for Roku. Multichannel News story

> Rock Hill, S.C.-based operator Comporium has deployed 1 Gbps Internet service in Midlands, S.C. The State story

Telecom News

> Windstream has formally launched its Kinetic IPTV service in Lexington, Ky., offering consumers an alternative set of dual and triple play broadband, voice and data bundles that they only could get from local cable provider Time Warner Cable. Article

Wireless Tech News

> Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company, introduced the next wave of its beacon technology, rolling out a cloud-based beacon management solution designed for multi-vendor Wi-Fi networks and beacon analytics. It also expanded its app developer partner program for the Meridian Mobile App Platform to boost innovation of location-based mobile apps. Article

Wireless News

> Android co-founder Andy Rubin is interested in returning to the phone business -- and the dominant mobile operating system he helped create -- after two years away from the market, according to a report in The Information. Article

And finally… Senga Services, a cable operator in Northwestern Canada, has drawn local controversy for outing the names of customers with overdue bills. CBC story

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