Arris sued for Surfboard modem flaw

Modem
“Arris also concealed the network latency problem with the modem through its marketing, advertising, and packaging of the product,”

Arris is being sued in California for connectivity problems related to its SB6190 Surfboard modem.

In early December, Intel deployed a firmware fix for the SB6190 after users complained about jitter and latency. The SB6190 wasn’t alone—other modems using Intel’s Puma 6 chipset have experienced similar issues. 

But Arris is the one getting sued. 

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RELATED: Arris and Intel partner on firmware fix for Puma 6-equipped cable modem

A suit (PDF) filed in a Northern California federal court by user Carlos Reyna, and obtained by DSL Reports, accused the leading cable-industry vendor of knowing about the defect, but shipping the SB6190, anyway. 

"By shipping modems with this defect, Arris sold consumer goods that were substantially below the quality generally available in the market, were not fit for the for the internet connectivity for which they were generally used, and were not adequately packaged and labeled,” the suit said. "Arris, therefore, has breached its implied warranty of merchantability in violation of the California Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Act."

“Arris also concealed the network latency problem with the modem through its marketing, advertising, and packaging of the product,” the suit added.

Reached for comment, an Arris rep told FierceCable the company doesn’t publicly speak about pending litigation. 

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