As everyone (including OTTs) should know, broadcasters want money for content

The three remaining people who haven't been following the Cablevision-Fox debacle--or even the Dish Network (Nasdaq: DISH)-Fox cage match--should now be on notice that the broadcasters are playing hardball with their content. They want "fair compensation" from cable operators and--this is important here, so pay attention--new ventures such as Google TV which would have a harder time competing with pay TV providers if they, too, had to pay for content.

"We invest a tremendous amount of time and money in making great shows and we should be justly compensated," CBS entertainment boss Nina Tassler said during an industry panel discussion that included the entertainment for five U.S. TV networks. "It is important to provide (content) but we have to be compensated."

Somehow that message is failing to take root with ivi, the $4.99 a month streaming service that has broadcasters climbing the walls. ivi, it seems, is doing well, especially in Cablevision markets, where subscriptions have soared 300 percent, according to CEO Todd Weaver. "We're growing faster than any cable company has ever grown," Weaver said.

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Related articles:
Web cable firm ivi TV announcing content deals 'soon'
Online video will defeat broadcasters' retransmission dreams: analyst
Broadcasters sue ivi; Roku, TiVo embrace Hulu Plus
Big 3 broadcasters block Google TV access to shows

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