In battle with broadcasters, public sides with Aereo, study finds

As the Supreme Court gets ready to rule in the matter of the broadcast networks vs. Aereo, new research suggests the public overwhelmingly favors the disruptive subscription video on demand service.

Polling 1,231 U.S. adults, market research firm Peerless Insights found that 46 percent of Americans want Aereo to prevail the High Court while only 15 percent favor the major U.S. broadcasters.

The survey also found that 40 percent of consumers agree that Aereo legitimately follows copyright laws, while only 19 percent disagree that it does. However, 35 percent think Aereo should compensate broadcasters just as traditional pay TV companies do.

The survey found that 34 percent of adults are interested in subscribing to Aereo--a figure that shoots up to 41 percent when only Millennials are factored into the sample. 

"Clearly, the demand for a service like Aereo is growing," said Peerless Insights co-founder Young Ko, in a statement. "Now the question is: can the industry find a business model that will benefit over-the-top services, TV broadcasters and viewers alike?"

Gaining public support seems to come fairly easy for Aereo, which posted a YouTube video on Monday laying out its claim of how it legitimately uses cloud-based broadcast antennas to render its service.

Aereo's fate, however, rests in the hands of only nine individuals, who are expected to render a decision on the company's fate by the end of this month.

Peerless Aereo study

Detail: 46 percent of U.S. adults polled want Aereo to win against broadcasters at the Supreme Court. (Source: Peerless Insights)

For more:
- see this press release

Related links:
Aereo pitches legitimacy of its tech in new YouTube video
Last supper for Aereo? Service debuts on Chromecast

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