Broadcasters sue ivi; Roku, TiVo embrace Hulu Plus

As expected by everyone, including streaming TV start-up ivi which tried to get a restraining order to stop it, broadcasters are suing the company and its founder Todd Weaver for copyright infringement.

Broadcasting heavyweights Walt Disney Co.'s (NYSE: DIS) ABC, CBS, FOX Network, NBC Universal's NBC and even PBS joined together in the suit filed in federal court in New York City. The broadcasters have granted permission for Web-based viewing of their shows on Hulu, Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) and Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL) but want nothing to do with ivi's $4.99 a month streaming package which they consider piracy. At least so far. The broadcasters are not the first to take issue with ivi. Other legal action has come from Major League Baseball, Univision, Telemundo, Cox Media, Tribune Television, Fisher Broadcasting, WPIZ, WGBH and WNET.org.

Speaking of Hulu, that streaming video service's business model received several positive bumps via deals with Roku and TiVo (Nasdaq: TIVO). Roku subscribers will be able to stream any show from Hulu Plus for $10 a month. TiVo added a Hulu Plus channel to its DVR boxes.

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