Building IPTV specialist Exterity open office in Atlanta to access U.S. market

Scottish building IPTV specialist Exterity is opening a facility Atlanta to take advantage of a growing U.S. market for local IPTV networks.

The company also appointed Roxanna Hunter as its Director of U.S. business development, responsible for developing new partnerships and direct sales. She previously was Exerity's marketing director.

Local, or building, IPTV can deliver digital radio, TV and video content across building, campus, or metropolitan area IP networks, generally using internal IP network's unused bandwidth to multicast. Building IPTV essentially makes TV and video just another network service, like email, Internet access, business applications and phone service, said Colin Farquhar, Exterity CEO. Content on local IPTV can include terrestrial and satellite TV, or content being delivered from video cameras, DVD/Blu-ray and digital signage players.

The technology often is used by corporations to relay live desktop TV feeds, in education, where access to worldwide satellite TV serves language departments and foreign students, or in any industry where video on-demand servers can make sales, training, and educational content more widely available, without the hassle of managing DVDs or tapes, he said.

"With organizations of all types turning to IPTV technology to maximize their existing network investments, these are exciting times for Exterity and the global building IPTV market as a whole," said Farquhar. "The opening of our new U.S. headquarters is a significant landmark for us and highlights our commitment to develop our presence in the US market further."

For more:

- see this release

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