CableLabs hires industry vet Doug Jones as principal architect

CableLabs HQ
Jones began working for CableLabs back in November as a contractor and was converted to full-time status on April 3.

CableLabs has confirmed the return of cable industry engineering veteran Doug Jones, who has taken on the role of principal architect. 

According to a spokeswoman for the industry technology consortium, Jones began working for CableLabs back in November as a contractor and was converted to full-time status on April 3. 

“He is principal architect working in R&D in the wired technologies group,” Elena Fuhrmann told FierceCable. “Specific responsibilities include working on optical technologies and applications such as DOCSIS 3.1, Full Duplex DOCSIS and back-haul for wireless services.” 

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News of Jones’ hiring was first reported by Multichannel News

Jones’ first stint at CableLabs ran from 1996 to 2002, during which time he worked on the original DOCSIS project. 

RELATED: CableLabs high on coherent optics for short-haul access networks

Jones most recently served as VP of access technologies for Comcast, where he worked on DOCSIS, FTTH, PON, Wi-Fi and HFC networks. Prior, he was chief cable architect for switched digital video company BigBand Networks, which was acquired by Arris in 2011. 

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