Cablevision trims Q4 video sub losses to 10K, has best 'organic' growth year since 2008

Matching other top 10 cable companies, each of which reported their best customer growth metrics since the start of the Great Recession in 2008, Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) said it reduced fourth-quarter pay-TV customer losses to just 10,000, down from 34,000 in the fourth quarter of 2014.

The Bethpage, N.Y.-based regional cable power touted what it called "its first year of organic growth" in eight years. The MSO added 25,000 high-speed Internet customers in the fourth quarter and was up 13,000 customer relationships overall.

Cablevision's fourth-quarter revenue decreased 0.1 percent to $1.629 billion. Net revenue for all of 2015 increased by 0.8 percent to $6.510 billion.

New Street Research analyst Jonathan Chaplin called the subscriber metrics "better than expected," adding "revenue was a touch light."

The year 2015, Cablevision CEO James Dolan said, "marked a turning point for Cablevision in several ways. We increased total Cablevision customer relationships and ended the year with more high-speed data customers than ever before in the nation's most competitive telecommunications market. Cablevision's improved operational performance demonstrates our continued execution of strategic initiatives, including competing on value rather than price, providing better products and services, and delivering a superior customer experience."

Cablevision, which is in the process of being acquired by European operator Altice NV, once again announced its earnings sans call with investors. The company said it expects the deal to close in the second quarter. 

For more:
- visit this Cablevision investor relations page

Special report: FierceCable's fourth quarter earnings calendar

Related articles:
Official FC cord-cutting tally: Top publicly traded operators lost 44K video subs in 2015
Cablevision to allow live-streaming of CBS outside the home
Cablevision pays Thomas Dolan $21M to settle compensation suit

Suggested Articles

AT&T TV Now – formerly DirecTV Now – is raising prices for its streaming television service for the second time this year.

Quibi, an upcoming mobile-first streaming service, has found a logical distribution partner in T-Mobile.

For now, it looks like Netflix and everyone else still have space to grow.