Canoe says VOD ad impressions were up 49% in Q3

Canoe chart
Canoe’s DAI solution is currently delivered into 36 million U.S. TV homes across the three cable operators its serves.

Advanced advertising consortium Canoe said Comcast, Charter and Cox combined to deliver over 5.668 billion dynamic ad insertions (DAI) into VOD programming in the third quarter, marking nearly 49% year-over-year growth. 

Through three quarters, Canoe says it has delivered 17.9 billion DAI impressions through the three operators vs. 12.8 billion through three quarters of 2016.

Canoe’s DAI solution is currently delivered into 36 million U.S. TV homes across the three cable operators its serves. 

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Canoe also said it ran 3,208 DAI campaigns in the third quarter, an increase of 51% from the 2,123 conducted in Q3 2016. 

RELATED: Cable VOD ad impressions up 21% in Q1, Canoe says business now bringing in $1B a year

As it has steadily grown the number of DAI impressions delivered in cable video-on-demand programming, Canoe has rarely discussed what kind of money its cable-operator constituents are making on all of this. In fact, in their quarterly earnings reports, the operators themselves don’t discuss it. 

However, in April, Canoe marketing chief Chris Pizzurro told FierceCable: "Safe to say the VOD ad market is now $1 billion ad marketplace when you include national programmers and local MVPD VOD."

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