Comcast enables Netflix 4K on X1, finally creates need for UHD set-tops

Netflix binge
Comcast says it remains focused on providing high-quality entertainment experiences across platforms.

Comcast said that select X1 customers with the right equipment can now watch Netflix 4K content. 

To enjoy the second-season premiere of Netflix’s “Stranger Things” and other content in 4K, customers will need a 25 Mbps internet connection—not a problem, since no X1 user has a ISP plan nearly that slow. They’ll also need an XG1v4 set-top and a 4K TV. 

RELATED: Comcast quietly deploys 4K set-top

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Over the last few years, as pay TV companies have largely naval-gazed over deployment of 4K and services, Netflix has carved out an industry-leading position, now offering around 1,200 hours of TV shows and movies in the UHD format. 

For its part, Comcast has evolved its TV distribution strategy to what it refers to being the “aggregator of aggregators,” integrating popular services like Netflix and YouTube into X1 and offering them as they would any other cable channel. 

"We remain focused on providing our customers high-quality entertainment experiences across platforms, which includes easy access to the best 4K programming," said Brynn Lev, VP of editorial and programming, content strategy and operations for Comcast Cable, in a statement. "We are thrilled to make the popular Netflix catalog of 4K programming available to X1 customers and will continue to rapidly expand the UHD programming choices available on the platform."

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