Comcast goes down in Oregon after car hits utility pole

Comcast Center headquarters in Philadelphia. Image: Comcast
Comcast said the extent of the damage required that it make more than 1,500 fiber-optic splices.

Around 30,000 Comcast customers in and around Corvallis, Oregon, lost service Saturday evening when a car struck a utility pole.

Comcast spokeswoman Amy Keiter said the cable operator had service restored by 6 p.m. Sunday, about 23 hours after the fiery crash on Highway 99W. 

"The fire melted our primary fiber-optic  feeder line into the city of Corvallis," Keiter told FierceCable in an email. "We had a repair team on site almost immediately to assess the situation and effect repairs. 

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"Our VP of Engineering, who was at the scene of the outage, explained to me that the extent of the damage required that we make more than 1,500 fiber-optic splices, which is a time-consuming process (each strand is about the width of a human hair). All service was restored to all residential and business customers by dinnertime yesterday," she added.

RELATED: Comcast experiences overnight nationwide outage

Local paper the Corvallis Gazette-Times was the first to report on the accident and subsequent interruptions. Power for local residents wasn’t restored until 9 a.m. Sunday.

Happily, the driver of the car that hit the pole was reportedly uninjured. 

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