Comcast investigating workers’ role in Indianapolis pileup on icy road

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Comcast said it is investigating its workers’ role in a series of accidents on an icy Indianapolis road, accidents that were caught on smart phone video that hit Reddit and has since gone viral. 

“When I watched this video I was very concerned by what I saw,” said Ed Marchetti, senior VP of technical operations for Comcast Cable, in a statement. “Our employees should always protect people and treat them with respect no matter what the situation. Safety matters most—especially in dangerous weather conditions like this.”

“We are actively investigating what happened when our technicians were on site to restore services during an outage and we will reach out to those who were impacted by this incident," Marchetti added. “Within the next 24-48 hours, my team leaders will meet with our technicians across our company to use this as an example of how important it is to make everyone’s safety a priority in everything we do.

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In the video, which isn’t dated, an Xfinity-branded truck is parked alongside an icy road at the top of hill, with a technician working on a box on the side of the road.

What appears to be a good samaritan—and also the videographer—is seen pleading with the two Comcast techs (one is positioned inside the truck). He asks both to position cones further down the road so that drivers emerging from the summit have more time to stop.

The Comcast workers appear indifferent as drivers on the road—some of whom are just going way too fast—end up in one pile-up after another. 

“Do you have more cones in the truck you can put up there?” the good samaritan asks a technician. “I have a couple more in the truck,” he responds, without ever moving to deploy them.

The other technician in the truck informs our narrator that the cones have been placed in accordance to the law, spaced 10 feet for every mile of the speed limit. He does not account for the severe weather in this statement. 

Comcast has, of course, found itself in the unenviable position, time and time again, of having to defend itself amid incidents caught on video, widely distributed over the internet, showing egregious indifference to its customers. 

But refusing to cancel internet service or fix a billing problem is one thing. This video seems to show basic disregard for public safety. 

“There’s no place for disrespect—treating people the right way is the only way to work,” Marchetti added.

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