Comcast, Liberty funnel more funds to ad startup Integrate

Advertising software startup Integrate received a $7 million boost in funding from Foundry Group, Comcast Ventures (Nasdaq: CMCSA) and Liberty Global Ventures (Nasdaq: LBTYA). The company, which makes software to help media buyers plan and manage ad campaigns, has raised a total of $22.25 million. Both Comcast and Liberty also participated in the company's $11 million funding round in 2012.

Integrate was founded in 2010 by former Olympic skier and NFL football player Jeremy Bloom and has about 120 employees in Scottsdale, Ariz., Denver, Boston, New York City and San Francisco. The company's AdHQ software tracks the performance of Web-based and mobile campaigns and can tell buyers how their campaigns are performing. The latest round of funding will be used to further develop Integrate's cloud-based system and to increase its number of large clients such as Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), Dell and Sony.

Comcast Ventures and Liberty Global Ventures have invested in other advertising-oriented companies as well. Last week the two venture funds announced that they joined a $20 million investment round in SundaySky, a targeted advertising firm that Cox Communications uses to target ads to potential customers after they "abandon" its website.

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