Comcast's latest service upgrade: Xfinity users can schedule callbacks via app

Continuing to implement common-sense customer service protocols under new customer service czar Charlie Herrin, Comcast  (NASDAQ: CMCSA) is now letting its Xfinity customers schedule a specific time for a rep to call them instead of waiting on hold.

With the new Xfinity "My Account" app feature, "Customers can schedule a time for a Comcast representative to call them to resolve whatever issue they may be dealing with--no waiting," blogs Herrin, who last month introduced a new feature that lets the MSO's subscribers better gauge when service technicians will arrive at their residences.

The app could generate frustration for some customers--users have to go through a series of troubleshooting steps before the "callback" option appears on their screen.

"But here's where it gets good," Herrin writes. "Simply enter in your phone number, select the time you want us to call you (call times are available in 15-minute windows), and you're all set. "

Comcast is, of course, trying to turn around a customer service reputation that ranks last among major U.S. service providers in numerous consumer surveys.

For more:
- read this Comcast corporate blog post

Related links:
Comcast charm campaign continues with app to track technician arrival time
Comcast announces another mea culpa amid billing system conversion
Comcast customer service czar makes first big move: apologies, credits for X1 outages
Comcast taps product exec Herrin to fill new customer service SVP role
The Verge of obsession? Tech pub ramps up series on Comcast customer service
Fast Wi-Fi, nifty interfaces are nice, Comcast, but customers clearly want better manners
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