Comcast's Roberts and Burke rake in $31M, while Cablevision execs take pay cut

As tax day approaches, it's worth noting that it pays to run a cable TV company, even in the lean years.

The top execs at the nation's top MSO, Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA), each pulled in more than $31 million in total compensation in 2013 with CEO Brian Roberts leading the way at $31.4 million and Steve Burke, now chief executive of NBCUniversal, gaining $31.1 million, according to a story in the Los Angeles Times.

Burke, who last year negotiated a new five-year deal with the company, saw his pay jump 18 percent from the $26.3 million he earned last year.

Other Comcast execs did well, too. CFO Michael Angelakis took home 17 percent less money than the previous year, but still pocketed $19.2 million. Comcast Cable President-CEO Neil Smit also earned a little less than 2012 but still managed a $17.4 million pay year. And David Cohen, the company's face in its efforts to acquire Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC), was paid about $14 million, a slight drop from his 2012 compensation, the newspaper said.

Meanwhile, up the road in Long Island, Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) Chairman-Founder Charles Dolan earned 41 percent less in 2013 when he took home $9.75 million compared to the $16.6 million he earned in 2012; CEO James Dolan took a 5.4 percent pay cut to $15.99 million (from 2012's $16.9 million) and CFO Gregg Seibert was down 8.8 percent to $10 million from $10.96 million, according to Multichannel News.

For more:
- the Los Angeles Times has this story
- and Multichannel News has this story

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