Comcast to build Charleston, SC call center, add 550 jobs

Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) fulfilled a major piece of its $300 million promise to improve its customer service acumen with the announcement that it's building a call center in Charleston, SC that will be staffed by 550 new workers. 

"It's the latest in a series of updates we've made throughout the region, including investments in making our network more reliable and other technologies — all part of our commitment to respect your time and simplify your experience," said Tom Karinshak, senior VP of customer service for Comcast.

The construction of the Charleston center follows the three new customer support centers Comcast is opening in Spokane, Wash.; Albuquerque, NM, and Tucson, Ariz. Announcing its plan to spend $300 million on customer improvement in May of 2015 at the INTX show, Comcast pledged.

Comcast said its aim is to answer a phone call in 30 seconds or less, respond to a tweet in 30 minutes or less and get to a customer at one of its stores in 10 minutes or less.

Is Comcast's $300 million charm campaign working?

Well, the MSO continues to tout its declining churn numbers during every quarterly earnings call (although it seems to always trace that back to the benefits of its X1 video technology).

However, it's been almost two years since the company's infamous Ryan Block customer service meltdown kicked off a wave of bad service interactions that went viral. Those types of incidents seem to be occurring less these days. 

For more:
read this Comcast blog post

Related articles:
Comcast customer service czar makes first big move: apologies, credits for X1 outages
Comcast's Smit: 'Customer service will be one of our best products'
Comcast to hire 5,500 new workers, spend $300M to bolster customer service

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