DirecTV set to launch Spanish-language online programming service; Matt Murphy steps down at Grande

More cable industry news from around the Web.

> Intel and MaxLinear announce the co-development of a next-generation modem/gateway chipset designed to work with the emerging DOCIS 3.1 standard. Story

> Sen. Dean Heller (R., Nev.) has requested information regarding confidential meetings the FCC has had with media companies as part of its review of Comcast's proposed takeover of Time Warner Cable. Story

> Comcast has hired former TWC chief counsel Julie Laine to oversee regulatory compliance for its proposed transaction with her ex-employer. Story

> Grande Communications announces the resignation of president Matt Murphy, who is leaving the cable operator to start a private-equity firm. Matt Rohre, VP of retail operations, will take over as interim president. Press release

> French telecom provider Iliad is poised to improve on its offer to acquire T-Mobile. Story

> The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunication Commission has begun hearings on whether to rule for a la carte distribution by pay-TV operators. Story

> Starz CEO Chris Albrecht told a Goldman Sachs Communicopia audience Thursday that his premium cable network is thinking about launching an a la carte streaming service. Story

> Sprint says it will not participate in the FCC's upcoming wireless-spectrum auction. Story

> DirecTV is moving forward with plans to launch a Spanish-language online programming service, YaVeo. Story

>And finally…  A study conducted in June by Frank N. Magid Associates found that 2.9 percent of U.S. pay-TV subscribers are "very likely" to cancel their service in the next year. That's up from 2.7 percent in 2013 and 2.2 percent in 2012. Story

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