Dish Network's dishNET broadband readies nationwide push

Starting next Monday, satellite TV operator Dish Network (Nasdaq: DISH) will expand availability of its dishNET broadband satellite Internet service nationwide. Positioned as a solution to answer rural broadband needs and provide broadband coverage to other under-served market segments with "4G-level" speed--up to 10 Mbps for downloads--the service starts at $39.99 per month, and features a $10 monthly discount when bundled with Dish TV packages.

Dish CEO Joseph Clayton is unveiling dishNET today at the flagship Cowboy Maloney's Electric City retail store in Jackson, Miss., the historic retail launch site of digital satellite TV and satellite radio services.

In announcing the offering, Dish noted that the Federal Communications Commission last month reported 19 million Americans lack access to high-speed Internet, including 14.5 million who live in rural regions, indicating that almost 24 percent of rural residents lack broadband access.

However, the rural broadband market opportunity also has turned into an abyss for some operators. Service providers such as the now-defunct Rocky Mountain Broadband have come up with ambitious plans to use wireless technologies such as WiMAX to address the market, but for various reasons, they haven't paid off. The successful satellite TV giant may be in a better position to address the market need, while also having the patience to hang in if acceptance is slow to start.

For more:
here's the Dish release

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Comcast recently touted Internet Essentials in Philadelphia
Rural WiMAX operator Rocky Mountain Broadband recently shut down

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