Genachowski makes spectrum push; FCC freezes LPTV applications

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski amping the volume on his broadband wireless pitch. Writing in The Washington Post, Genachowski compares wireless spectrum to "visible infrastructure projects, such as highways and high-speed rail" as economic growth drivers. Other infrastructure, while costly, can be rebuilt and improved an infinite number of times. Wireless spectrum, however, is "finite" he writes and "we risk running out of bandwidth."

Most specifically, Genachowski reiterated that the FCC wants 500 MHz of spectrum for broadband wireless and that TV broadcasting spectrum is the place to look. "Today, when 90 percent of Americans receive their broadcast news and entertainment via cable and satellite (unless, of course, they're Dish or Cablevision subscribers), devoting (300 MHz) of spectrum to over-the-air broadcasting threatens to starve one of the most vibrant sectors of our economy and lead to consumer frustration with mobile devices."

Of course the chairman makes no mention of must-carry and/or retransmission rules and how pushing broadcasters onto satellite, telco and cable service providers would be fairly accomplished for those entities.

In a related matter, the FCC froze new applications for digital low power TV stations and translator stations in rural areas as part of the plan to recoup spectrum from broadcasters.

For more:
- see this opinion piece
- and this story

Related articles:
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Broadcasters using mobile DTV as leverage in fight with FCC over spectrum

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