Hurts so good! 3DTV pushes ahead despite health, technical drawbacks

3DTV, which got short shrift at the recent Consumer Electronics Show, isn't a dead issue. In fact, it's quietly continuing to make its way back into the public head--and, according to some experts, doing so as a major pain with some precautions needed, according to a story in the Canadian Press.

"We do not recommend watching 3D if you are in bad physical condition, need sleep or have been drinking alcohol," according to a warning on the Samsung Australian website that pretty much eliminates about three-quarters of the U.S. audience. Optometrists add that as many as one in four viewers could experience tiresome eyestrain that could leave them dizzy and provoke headaches.

Despite all this hand wringing, Cablevision Systems (NYSE: CVC) thinks there's enough flash to 3D that it has started airing cable's first 3D direct response ad to support its triple play package. Interestingly, the 3D version of the ad is running online and in Cablevision-owned theaters; a TV version is airing in 2d. Cablevision is even distributing 300,000 or more 3D glasses via newspapers and direct mail to make it easier for viewers to watch the ads online although they won't do anything for those watching the TV ads.

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Related articles:
Cosgrove: Huge content library, sports will drive 3DTV
3D TV will take off by 2015: ABI Research
Samsung details the dangers of 3D TV for Australians

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