Layer3’s Binder: Tesla service vehicles cost far less than cable ‘bucket trucks’

With his startup pay-TV service set to deploy a fleet of 100 pricey Tesla Model X service vehicles, Layer3 CEO Jeff Binder said the approach is far less expensive than purchasing and maintaining traditional cable or satellite TV service vans. 

“It is actually quite a bit less for us to operate those vehicles,” Binder said to FierceCable. “And even the upfront acquisition costs is quite a bit less than say a bucket truck for XYZ MSO. It may look to you like it’s an expensive approach, but it’s actually half the cost of approaching it the traditional way.”

RELATED: Layer3 launches in Dallas; coming to NYC, sources say

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Denver-based Layer3, which has rolled out service in its home base, Chicago, Washington, D.C., LA and Dallas, initially envisioned using the electric BMC i3s, but opted for the superior range of the Tesla Model X.

Of course, the electric vehicles should be far cheaper to operate than the traditional 10,000-pound petrol-guzzling pay-TV service van. But we’re still a little fuzzy on Binder’s startup math.

MSRPs for Tesla Model X start at $82,500, although fleet pricing and government rebates undoubtedly reduce Layer3’s bill.

The base MSRP for a GMC Savana Cargo Van is just under $31,000.

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