McSlarrow finds a spot with Comcast in Washington; Powell reportedly in line for job

NCTA President Kyle McSlarrow has found a new job: Starting in April he will be the president of Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA)-NBCUniversal, Washington, D.C. with the dual responsibilities of running the business operations and public policy for the nation's biggest MSO. Additionally, he will lead strategic planning around the extension of Comcast Business Services at the federal and state level.

Since the political world abhors a vacuum, latest reports are that McSlarrow's post won't stay vacant for long with former FCC Commission Chairman Michael Powell stepping into the void. The NCTA has only said officially that it is still in a search mode for a new leader.

In a statement, Cox Communications President Pat Esser, who is chairman of the board of NCTA, called McSlarrow a "visionary leader" and cited his "energetic and creative approach to public policy issues."

McSlarrow, who joined NCTA in 2005, announced he would be leaving NCTA last November and hinted that he had some irons in the fire. The hottest poker turned out to be Comcast, where, at least on first blush, he'll continue what he's been doing: interfacing with the politicos to advance the cable (now Comcast) agenda.

"The entire senior leadership team has worked closely with Kyle as he led NCTA and we are now thrilled to have him play such a vita role at Comcast," said David Cohen, Comcast's executive vice president in a news release.

For more:
- see this news release
-and this story
- and this NCTA news release

Related articles:
McSlarrow ready to move on after NCTA stint
Consumer groups want federal probe of TV Everywhere
Industry cheers FCC's Universal Service Fund reform; next up, interactive map

Suggested Articles

Beginning Dec. 10, Comcast will replace Starz and begin offering Epix, a premium network owned by MGM, in some of its Xfinity TV premium packages.

Comcast last Friday moved Turner Classic Movies to its Sports Entertainment add-on package, a move that angered several subscribers.

With the streaming wars intensifying, the “aggregation wars” are poised for greater activity as well: everyone wants a piece of this pie.