Netflix partners with SoftBank in Japan; Frontier nets former Ericsson, Microsoft

More cable news from across the Web:

> One columnist is asking: "Will Viacom be here in a decade?" Daily Beast article

> Netflix said it partnered with SoftBank for a "fully integrated" Netflix experience in Japan. Deadline article

> A former executive of Ericsson and Microsoft, Peter Mihan, will be the new assistant VP of video product and sales at Frontier Communications. Multichannel News article

Telecom News

> Windstream is looking to put up for sale its data center business, Windstream Hosted Solutions, reports Bloomberg citing people close to the company. Article

Wireless Tech News

> Republic Wireless is slowly implementing its "Salsa" technology that it says will better support Wi-Fi calling and handoffs between Wi-Fi and cellular networks. Article

> With backing from companies like AT&T, the GSMA has launched an initiative to accelerate the rollout of cellular networks customized for machine-to-machine communications. Article

European Wireless News

> Nokia's Here unit took another step towards defining common specifications for processing information from automotive sensors through the cloud by hosting a forum comprising 16 auto industry companies. Article

Wireless News

> Apple CEO Tim Cook indicated that he has confidence in the company's business in China, especially its iPhone sales, despite investors' fears about slowing economic growth in the world's largest smartphone market that have sent stock markets around the globe spiraling downward. Article

> Samsung Electronics ran out of Galaxy devices it had set aside for iPhone customers to "test drive" for a month on the first day of the promotion, which Samsung attributed to strong demand. Article

And finally… AshleyMadison's hacked data has been used in extortion attempts. Article

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