Report: Comcast ghost-writing pro merger letters from politicians to FCC

Letters from politicians to the FCC supporting Comcast's purchase of Time Warner Cable have been ghostwritten by Comcast PR executives, according to The Verge.

The tech blog says it has obtained emails through public records requests confirming that Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) has played Cyrano de Bergerac on at least several occasions in which local government officials have written letters supporting the deal.

For example, on Aug. 21 of last year, Roswell, Ga., mayor Jere Wood wrote to the Federal Communications Commission, "When Comcast makes a promise to act, it is comforting to know that they will always follow through. This is the type of attitude that makes Roswell proud to be involved with such a company."

However, according to The Verge, all the Republican mayor did was contribute a one-line sign-off to the missive--the bulk of it was penned by Comcast's PR department.

The tech blog also says it has uncovered emails revealing a similar ghost-writing relationship for Oregon Democratic State Secretary Kate Brown, among others.

For more:
- read this story from The Verge

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