Reports: Net neutrality will help economy; 3DTV won't lure new TV buyers

> Studies are like Play-Doh: Press down on a piece of paper and come up with whatever you want to hear. A report from the Institute of Policy Integrity at the NYU School of Law pressed down and determined that the net neutrality stance being widely promoted by Verizon (NYSE: VZ) and Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) is off base. Rather than hurting the economy and stifling innovation--the telecom/search engine view--net neutrality can help "preserve the open Internet we have come to rely on and the economic benefit we can gain from it." The opposition's response? "This is a silly study," said US Telecom President Walter B. McCormick Jr. Guess he won't be going to Camelot, either. Story.

> Speaking of silly studies, did you see the one from Deloitte that found 83 percent of consumers say that 3D won't cause them to rush out and buy a new TV and that 60 percent won't pay extra for a 3DTV? Looking at the half full glass, though (as the consumer electronics guys surely will) 21 percent said they would pay 10 percent more for a set with 3D features. Story.

> Comcast's (Nasdaq: CMCSA) confidence that it will soon be the proud parent of NBC Universal is reflected in a report from the New York Post that the MSO is "quietly searching outside for the company for a top executive to fill a new position in charge of its $8 billion ad empire following the acquisition of NBC Universal." Story.

> Videotron has jumped to the front of the broadband speed line with a 120 Mbps downstream/20 Mbps upstream service that it's hawking to residential customers for $149.95 a month. The speed tops previous leader Suddenlink's 107 Mbps. Story.

And finally... Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) has invaded Canada with its on-demand competitive video play to somewhat sour reviews. "The selection is seriously anemic," said the Ottawa Citizen. "After a three-month wait the official opening of Netflix is going off more like a pop gun than a cannon blast." Story.

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