Samsung announces 82 " 3D ultra-high definition TV

Samsung has released its vision for next generation TV, a bandwidth-hogging, 3D-immersive digital cinema. Eighty-two inches big and using four times the pixels of HDTV, the ultra-high definition set will need compression and computer power not yet invented in order to work. Samsung believes the demand for photo realistic 3 D television will drive the uptake of the big screens. The screen will refresh at least 60 times a second and will require new display electronics to handle the required picture realism.

Samsung released the tech specs for the TV at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco last week. Chief executive of Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Hyung Kyu Lim, said digital content with such a display at 24 frames a second "requires around 300Mb/s for transmission when compressed using JPEG2000 adopted by DCI. Assuming an effective bandwidth allocated per-household at around 100Mb/s using 1Gb/s Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH), it is apparent that a new innovative compression technology with three times more efficiency will be required." Mr Lim said it is not expected the processor power for such a device would be available around 2015, or 2012 for a multi-core processor.

A recent paper on bandwidth demands by the Discovery Center predicted U.S. demand for bandwidth would increase 50 fold to one zettabyte by 2015, fueled by increased demand for video and video telephony. If 3D ultra high definition television become popular, this prediction will be seen as conservative. Samsung also assumed this beast would only work with fiber to the home.

For more:
- Samsung's vision for next-gen TV Article
- Samsung showed the TV off at CES2008 but did not release its tech specs Pictures

Related articles:
Zettabyte flood predicted for 2015 Report
Who has the most high definition? Report

Suggested Articles

Comcast, Charter and ViacomCBS today announced that they will all take equal ownership of Blockgraph.

Cord cutting will get worse for cable companies. But the financial impact for those same companies will be limited.

Comcast reached a distribution agreement with HBO Max and will offer the service for no extra charge to its existing HBO subscribers.