Sony launches YouTube channel for 4K content creators, hopes to spur programming growth

Sony has launched a new YouTube channel themed around 4K content, not only to promote its line of 4K/Ultra HD cameras, but also to spur growth in 4K usage by content creators.

Shipments of 4K-capable displays have proliferated, and 4K programming services have emerged on pay-TV platforms like Comcast Xfinity and DirecTV, as well as SVOD services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. Meanwhile, from Roku to TiVo, manufacturers are offering an array of 4K-capable set-tops. Still, growth in U.S. 4K video consumption has been slow. 

The major reason for this slow adoption has been broadly identified as a dearth of 4K content. 

"We're building this community with the development of this technology," said the channel's manager, Brett Erlich. "As it grows, we'll grow." 

As for how many U.S. Internet users have the bandwidth needed to view the content in 4K/Ultra HD is another story. Erich said that Sony has no figures on that. However, a 15 Mbps download speed is generally considered the minimum threshold to stream 4K. And according to Akamai, about 21 percent of U.S. homes have broadband speeds of 15 Mbps or higher. 

"This is all just an attempt to give people who use these cameras and share what their experiences are, their opinions and why they like using the cameras so much," Erlich said. 

For more:
- read this Hollywood Reporter story
- read this TV Technology story

Related articles:
HEVC Advance patent group might give Netflix, Amazon and other 4K players a break
Roku reportedly will announce 4K-capable device in wake of Amazon Fire TV update
Akamai: Only 21% of U.S. homes have enough bandwidth to stream 4K

Suggested Articles

When Charter and Disney earlier this week announced their new carriage agreement, they included news about cooperatively working against video piracy, which…

Cord cutters who opt for streaming video services instead of traditional pay TV will inevitably increase their broadband consumption. But some new research…

A cord-cutting catastrophe struck the U.S. pay TV industry in the second quarter and took a collective 1.53 million subscribers with it. Or maybe not, but it’s…