Sony stands behind struggling Google TV; says 3D TV sales also slow

Sony, one of Google's three major partners in its Google TV initiative, says that despite a general cold shoulder from consumers, and Google's decision to abort some planned hoopla at next month's Consumer Electronics Show, the roll out of the smart-TV platform is "in line with expectations."

Sony's executive deputy president and head of Sony's TV business, Hiroshi Yoshioka, speaking to the press in Tokyo today, declined to elaborate, but did acknowledge that early reviews of the platform were not what the company expected.

"Some reviews have been good, some have been bad," he said. "It might take a little longer for users to really start having fun" with Google TVs.

Google has been struggling to get Hollywood to buy into the platforms, with all major networks blocking their content from Google TV devices. Google last week said it was planning to push harder to grow its streaming movie service, with one goal to bring newer content to Google TV.

Yoshioka also said that Sony's line of 3D TV sets, which went on sale this summer, have been less than the 10 percent of overall TV sales that Sony had expected. He said lack of content was a major factor.

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