Viamedia grows local TV ad footprint through Northland alliance

Direct-to-consumer ads
While Viamedia is growing its list of partners, the company is also continuing its antitrust fight with Comcast. (Getty/FS-Stock)

Northland Communications announced a new partnership with Viamedia, an independent local ad management company, that will expand Viamedia’s local TV advertising footprint.

Viamedia will be adding nine new DMAs to its portfolio, including Savannah and Augusta, Georgia; Medford, Oregon; Austin, Texas; Birmingham, Alabama; Wichita, Kansas; Lincoln, Nebraska; Denver, Colorado; and Greeneville, Tennessee.

“Northland Communications has done a great job in serving consumers and businesses in the communities they serve,” said Mark Lieberman, president and CEO of Viamedia, in a statement. “We are confident that Viamedia’s innovative, cross-media advertising solutions will add even more value to Northland’s offerings and will benefit subscribers and businesses alike.”

RELATED: Comcast’s antitrust fight with Viamedia heads to trial

“Viamedia is an unparalleled force in the industry and the clear choice for managing our ad sales within these markets,” said Ed Butler, senior vice president at Northland, in a statement. “Viamedia’s values match ours, with a full commitment to serve our communities and ensure growth. Viamedia’s cutting-edge solutions will significantly boost our advertising services to local businesses seeking to reach their customers and will enable us to participate more significantly during the crucial political ad season.”

The new partnership adds to Viamedia’s growing national footprint.With the addition of nine markets, including four entirely new to Viamedia – Savannah, Medford, Birmingham and Wichita – the company now manages sales and operations for cable companies across 76 designated market areas in 34 states.

While Viamedia is growing its list of partners, the company is also continuing its antitrust fight with Comcast. Last month, the company said the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit decided to reinstate the case, which alleges Comcast violated state and federal antitrust laws by forcing competing cable TV providers to purchase local advertising representation services from Comcast as a condition of participation in joint selling arrangements for regional advertising, also known as interconnects.

Suggested Articles

AT&T is nearly five months out from the launch of HBO Max and the service still doesn’t have distribution agreements in place with Amazon or Roku.

As for content, audiences have primarily tuned into entertainment and news programming.

Disney may be sandbagging Hulu’s international expansion plans to avoid having to pay more to Comcast, which still owns one-third of the service.