We Network widens its focus to engage more men

AMC's We Networks will keep its name--a reference to Women's Entertainment--but will widen its focus to include more men, a network executive said.

"It will still remain a network primarily for women, but we don't want to alienate men," President-General Manager Marc Juris said in a Variety story. "When you call yourself women's entertainment, even though we had gotten away from that, it's still in people's heads."

The We name, when not connected overtly to women, works as a hook in the social media-conscious space, Juris added. That, said Juris, positions We well in a changing TV environment.

"TV's role is not necessarily to entertain but to start a conversation," he said. "When you look online, it's plain to me you see such passionate defense or protection of all these TV celebrities or shows. It's really because there's this giant, border-less community of people who ever passionately love or hate shows and certain media stars."

That would certainly seem to fall within the bailiwick of a planned We program, Sex Box, a derivative of a U.K. program where couples have sex on a soundproof box and then meet with a moderator to discuss the act. Also in a trend that's definitely manworthy, We has a pilot, Charlie Sheen's Bad Influence that follows engaged couples to determine how well they know each other.

We, which competes with the likes of Lifetime and Oxygen, is in a needed growth phase, the story said, noting that We costs 12 cents per subscriber while Lifetime brings in 32 cents.

For more:
- Variety has this story

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