What's it mean for 3D when SD rules even as HD dominates?

First off, let's be clear: 3DTVs are not stocking stuffers. Based on recent Nielsen statistics that's probably a good thing because it might not be wise to encourage too many people to go out and buy a new set this holiday season if they don't need to.

It seems that the majority of U.S. households (56 percent) are now equipped with HDTVs but only 13 percent of the total day viewing on cable and 19 percent of viewing on broadcast would be considered "true HD" where the viewer has actually tuned to an HD channel.

Apparently the content is there in HD, but the people aren't interested, which causes some pause when considering the holiday push to get 3D sets where the content wouldn't even be there for the most part. Consumers could end up with a more expensive device just to watch standard def programming.

For more:
- see this blog

Related articles:
Report: Steady 3D TV growth seen in U.S. future; IPTV 3D adoption lags
Here's a surprise, 3DTV sales aren't booming

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