YouTube TV launches in 12 more markets including Denver and Cleveland

YouTube TV
YouTube TV

Continuing to carve out deals with local broadcast network affiliates, YouTube TV has expanded into 12 more markets. 

The new markets include Cleveland, Denver, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Oklahoma City, Salt Lake City, San Diego, Kansas City, Oklahoma City and St. Louis. Also included: Greensboro, North Carolina; Harrisburg, Virginia; and Hartford, Connecticut.

YouTube announced two weeks ago that its fledgling virtual pay-TV service had surpassed 50% of the U.S. TV market, with expansion into 14 additional markets including Baltimore, Boston, Cincinnati, Columbus, Ohio, Jacksonville-Brunswick, Las Vegas, Louisville, Memphis, Nashville, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Seattle-Tacoma, Tampa-St. Petersburg-Sarasota, and West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce.

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YouTube TV is now in 41 markets overall.

RELATED: Hulu, other vMVPDs ramp up affiliate deal chest-thumping

The service launched over the spring in the five top TV markets, including New York, Los Angeles and Chicago. 

YouTube TV is offering more than 40 channels for $35 a month, a fairly standard price point in the new vMVPD business.

The service’s calling card seems to be local broadcast channels—YouTube has deployed its vMVPD in markets in which it has carved out access to all of the Big Four affiliates. 

YouTube has yet to release subscription data for its new livestreaming service. 

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