Amazon revises studio executive structure: Cheng and Ropell to report to Product Development Chief Jeff Blackburn

Amazon sign on storefront
Cheng, the former chief product officer for digital media at Disney/ABC, holds the title of interim head of Amazon Studios. Ropell, a former VP of content at Netflix, serves as VP of worldwide movies for Amazon. 

With two of the highest ranking Amazon original content executives leaving the company in recent weeks, sources close to the company say that former ABC digital executive Albert Cheng and ex-Netflix operative Jason Ropell are now in charge of the online retail giant’s studio operations. 

Both executives, the source said, report to Jeff Blackburn, Senior VP of Business Development Jeff Blackburn, a 19-year Amazon veteran. 

Cheng, the former chief product officer for digital media at Disney/ABC, holds the title of interim head of Amazon Studios. Ropell, a former VP of content at Netflix, serves as VP of worldwide movies for Amazon. 

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Reporting to Cheng are the following: former Fox executive Sharon Tal Yguado, head of scripted series development; Tara Sorensen, head of kids TV development; and heather Schuster, head of unscripted development. 

Amazon representatives had no comment for Fierce. 

Description of Amazon’s studio reporting structure comes two weeks after studio head Roy Price left following an investigation of alleged sexual harassment. Price was followed out the door last week by Joe Lewis, who headed comedy and drama series development under Price, and who was also caught up in the same investigation. 

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