Encoding.com lands Revision3's encoding business

Cloud-based video encoding service Encoding.com scored a big customer win this week, announcing it had landed Internet TV network Revision3's encoding work.

Revision3, which last week entered into an agreement to be acquired by Discovery for $30 million, had been using an in-house system to transcode its online video content, which ranges from shorts to programs that run more than an hour in length.

The video company creates and produces more than 30 high-quality HD, original weekly and daily episodic video programs, and reaches an audience of over 23 million unique users on the full range of mobile devices and browsers, totaling more than 100 million video views a month.

Revision3 generates multiple output renditions for each source video, so that fans can watch at any time from any device: web, mobile phone, tablet, or set-top box. Originally focused on content targeting a tech base, Revision3 has recently added "channels" where fans can tune to Rev3Games and Rev3Tech.

Working with Encoding.com's scalable cloud-based platform, Revision3 said it would be able to meet its goal to "put video on anything with a screen."

Revision3 is representative of a number of media companies that initially constructed "do-it-yourself" encoding operations. Companies in the space are increasingly turning to encoding and transcoding vendors to reduce their spend on hardware and software, leveraging a number of cloud-based software-as-a-service vendors like Encoding.com.

Revision3 said it made the move when it found the in-house encoding demands were becoming an increasing drain on its resources.

"Working with Encoding.com has enabled our Production team to focus its energies on generating superb quality output, while eliminating the overhead of managing encoding infrastructure in-house," said Rob DeMillo, CTO of Revision3. "The Encoding.com team has been very responsive to our needs and continues to build out new features to meet our evolving requirements."

Encoding.com also has been busy adding to its own offerings, building a private cloud that can more easily manage the huge files generated by content owners, and recently reaching a deal with Dolby Laboratories to integrate Dolby Digital Plus within Encoding.com's video platform.

The deal will allow content owners who use Encoding.com to deliver their premium content with Dolby Digital Plus. The technology delivers studio-quality HD audio to a large array of devices, including smart phones, connected TVs, Blu-ray players, tablets and game consoles.

"Mobile phones and laptops have been the ugly stepchild of the industry, in terms of audio and video quality," Encoding.com President Jeff Malkin said at the time. "Dolby technology will change that."

Encoding.com, a four-year-old venture-backed startup, counts more than 3,000 companies as clients, and plays in the media, entertainment, education and enterprises verticals.

For more:
- see this release

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