H.264 already the clear winner in video-format battle?

If numbers don't, in fact, lie, it's increasingly clear that the battle for video-format supremacy already is all but over. After Apple's video trend referSteve Jobs Thursday launched an all-out attack on Adobe's Flash--he says its unreliable, a memory hog and a security risk--Microsoft came to the same conclusions, and made them public, on Friday. The double-barreled blast shouldn't come as much of a surprise, as Flash has been losing its panache rapidly.

Blogsite TechCrunch over the weekend had a post quoting figures from Encoding.com that showed that while H.264 made up just 31 percent of the company's encoding volume in 2Q09, it was 66 percent of its workload in the first quarter this year. At the same time Flash's VP6 and FLV have dropped from a combined 69 percent in 2Q09 to 26 percent in the first quarter this year.

Encoding.com has racked up more that 5 million encodes in the past 12 months for clients ranging from Brightcove to MTVNetworks and Nokia.

For more:
- see this chart of video-format encoding trends
- see this blog entry

Related articles:
Microsoft joins Apple in criticism of Flash; says it'll drop support in IE9
In the Apple vs. Adobe Flash brawl, the winner is... online video, eventually
Adobe releases online-video friendly CS5

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