Justice Dept. looks to make illegal video streaming a felony; Sarah Palin launches SVOD channel

More online video news from across the Web:

> The Department of Justice wants to make online streaming of copyright-infringing content a felony, bringing it in line with penalties for downloading content illegally. Story

> Wingnuts can now get all Sarah Palin, all the time for $9.95 a month via her subscription-based online video channel. Story

> Qwilt, which provides online video caching, delivery and analytics, said its North American customer base has grown 400 percent in the past 12 months. Release

> Spanish streaming service Wuaki.tv is bolstering its expansion in Europe through Conviva's delivery solutions. Release

> Turkish satellite operator Digiturk is offering an 80-channel online pay-TV service delivered to customers overseas. Story

> Brand marketing on YouTube's crowded beach is important, but there are pitfalls to be aware of. OnlineVideo.net's Troy Dreier lists a few. Video

> Vessel, the mysterious new startup by former Hulu CEO Jason Kilar, may be targeting YouTube's top content producers with the aim of luring them away to the new site with promises of bigger revenue splits. Story

> Will Seinfeld come to Netflix, finally? Rumors are that a deal is being cut right now. Story

And finally… What does the future hold for Connected TV? Story

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