Online video programming draws VC money, sponsor interest

Professionally produced online video is staging a comeback as ore venture capital firms sponsors are looking to fund new initiatives, as companies look to ride a wave of online video popularity.

And, rather than expecting online video to roll past traditional broadcasting programming, online video is, according to The New York Times, firmly sliding into a supporting role, seen as a complementary media.

"There's an inevitability to Web video that makes it exciting," said Rob Barnett, the chief executive of My Damn Channel, which features original comedy and music shows. "I often think of my daily business life as a guy running a cable network in the early 1980s. There is, no matter how you slice it, a timeline for any new industry to grow."

As online video has seen its popularity grow, advertisers have followed, booking million-dollar deals that-while they pale in comparison to TV buys-nonetheless are significant for the industry.

For more:
- see this NYT article

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