Ooyala debuts PayPal-powered online video paywall

ooyala paywall integration with paypalOnline video platform Ooyala has rolled out a new product targeted at enterprises, especially media companies, looking to better monetize their video offerings. The company's new Ooyala Paywall allows publishers to easily place a payment mechanism in front of premium content from online on-demand video to live streaming events like sporting events or concerts.

Ooyala Paywall is powered by PayPal, and allows users to pay with a PayPal account or credit card.

The level of user control built into the product allows users to change Ooyala Paywall menuthe length of previews, the price, how many times a video can be viewed and the length of the window in which it can be viewed, all through a very simple interface that makes it easy to experiment with each parameter, even price, on the fly to see what combination works best.

The product will appeal to more than just media companies. It's an easy way (you, literally can set up a paywall in a couple of minutes) to simplify transactions for e-learning companies, for example, or for any publisher who has high-value video they want to monetize. You can even allow your video to be syndicated across the web--with the paywall intact and accessible.

Ooyala Paywall is only being offered on a limited basis this quarter, Product Manager Alex Holub told FierceOnlineVideo, but they expect to roll it our more broadly in the first quarter of 2011.

"Media fragmentation makes it hard for publishers to pay the costs of high-quality content with advertising alone," said Bismarck Lepe, Ooyala's president of product. "The best path to maximum revenue is a hybrid model with both ads and paid distribution."

For more:
- see this release

Related articles:
Ooyala raises $22 million for international push
Online video platform Ooyala rolls out iPhone app for mobile video
Ooyala expands online video analytics suite

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