Orb gives Macs streaming media anywhere functionality

Apple users rejoice! Orb Networks has finally released an orb for the Mac, making it easier than ever to access photos, music, and even stream videos, from your home PC to any Internet-connected device, including your iPhone. If it lives in iTunes, it can now live on any of your devices.

It’s taken awhile for Orb to migrate to the Mac, despite being the first streaming media player for the iPhone in 2008. Launched in 2005 for Windows PCs, it first showed up for iPhone users as a jail broken app before getting the iTunes App Store stamp of approval. iPhone users have downloaded the OrbLive app some 500,000 times.

The free Mac-based app (or the Windows PC version) lets users stream content, and even webcams, to laptops, mobile phones, and TVs connected to a game console without having to upload content to the cloud. It’s a simple and elegant solution, and it’s long overdue for the Mac. It will run on any Mac with OS X 10.5 or later, and, says the company, later versions will include support for live TV.

“Orb users are a wildly passionate bunch. They let us know -- how I say this gently -- ‘frequently’ about the desire for what they described as the best media application running on the best media computer,” said Joe Costello, Orb Networks CEO. “I am ecstatic to announce that for the first time, Mac users can enjoy the same high-quality media streaming from iTunes to their remote devices as PC users have had for the past four years.”

For more:
- see this release

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