Report: Google partners with Intel, Sony for major Google TV play

The world of over-the-top online video delivery just got a little more complicated for the company's that were hoping to stake a claim in the rapidly growing industry.

The New York Times is reporting that Google, Intel and Sony are teaming up to develop new televisions and a set-top box based on Google's Android OS that would be called Google TV. A source told the Times that Google TV would have a Web interface based on Google's Chrome Web browser, would perform search functions, support social networks like Facebook and would bring other Web-based content to the living room.

The partnership brings some of the most powerful players in the tech industry into a game that so far has been the milieu of smaller, venture-backed companies that were hoping to carve out niche's for themselves as online video delivery matured. The market just grew up in a hurry.

Remote-control specialist Logitech also is part of the endeavor; the company already had developed a remote control with an integrated keyboard for use with the system, the Times Reported. None of the companies would comment for the article.

According to the article, the project has been in the works for several months and Google already has developed a prototype STB, but the technology could end up in other devices, as well as TVs. The TV application apparently runs on the energy-efficient Atom chip developed by Intel. The program is far enough along that testing already is being performed with Satellite TV player Dish Network, which has a long-standing relationship with Google. A Dish spokesman declined comment.

For more:
- see this Times article

Related article:
Google plans 1Gbps Internet trial

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