Rich media ad creation process 'riddled with roadblocks,' Jivox survey says

Even as demand for rich media ads across multiple screens becomes ravenous, ad agencies responsible for delivering the product find the process "riddled with roadblocks" and in need of reworking, according a study by multiscreen interactive advertising company Jivox.

Image source: Jivox

About 51 percent of ad agencies have seen more client demand for "dynamic rich media ads," and another 20 percent expect to see more interest, but "those that are running rich media ads are finding it difficult to do so across different screen sizes, with 88 percent agreeing that the process is somewhat to very stressful" and another 42 percent characterizing it as "painful," the research found. About 15 percent don't even try.

Problems aside, the report found that advertisers must find a way to market their wares across multiple screens, because 69 percent of all Internet users access the Web through mobile devices and "[i]f these rich media ads are in flash or not optimized for mobile, they won't render effectively," the report said. That means they won't leave a good impression and that results in a negative impact on ROI.

"These findings show that we need to move to the next generation of ad platforms that are adaptive, real-time and more efficient--only then can we alleviate some of the stress that traditional rich media causes," concluded Diaz Nesamoney, CEO and founder of Jivox, in a corporate press release.

For more:
- Jivox issued this rich media survey
- and Jivox issued this press release

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