Seton Hill University latest school to give every student a free iPad

While there are still legions of doubters out there about the viability of Apple's new iPad, which begins to roll out Saturday, there's an increasing swell of acceptance that will likely make it one of the company's most successful devices ever.

Analysts already are revising their estimates of how many of the table devices are likely to be sold this year, at least one says a target of 8-10 million isn't to far fetched.

Apple has positioned the iPad as the Swiss Army knife of the connected world, and is pitching it as an indispensable tool for staying connected, watching online video and more. It's launch has prompted a number of companies in the online video industry to announce support for the device.

Apple's be-all pitch is gaining momentum.

Seton Hill University just announced that every full-time student on campus, and every faculty members, would get an iPad as part of the school's Griffin Technology Advantage, do-everything

The school--which also gives incoming students a 13-inch MacBook, and another one after two years which they can keep--says the devices "foster creative literacy."

Oregon's George Fox University also is giving students a choice between an iPad or MacBook.

"The trend in higher education computing is this concept of mobility, and this fits right in with that trend," said a George Fox spokesman. "At the same time, we realize there are a number of uncertainties. Will students struggle with a virtual keyboard? Can the iPad do everything students need it to do when it comes to their college education? These are the kinds of questions we really won't know the answer to until we get started."

For more:
- see the George Fox website
- see the Seton Hill website

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