UltraViolet DRM to launch Oct. 11 with WB's 'Horrible Bosses'

Cloud movie digital rights management tool UltraViolet gets its first major pubic test next week when Warner Bros. releases Horrible Bosses to retail outlets on Oct. 11.

Ultraviolet DRM -Horrible Bosses

Horrible Bosses (pictured) will be UltraViolet's first major public test in the U.S.

The DRM platform, which has been adopted by most major studios (except Disney), cable companies, telcos and distributors like Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX), will allow consumers to watch content instantly on up to 12 different devices--including TVs, computers, tablets and smartphones--when they buy a title with UV rights. Once a consumer sets up an account, a "digital locker," purchased UV-enabled content will be accessible from the cloud from connected devices.

Justin Herz, senior vice president of direct-to-consumer and general manager of advanced digital services at Warner Bros., speaking at the MIPCON conference in Cannes, said the release would be preceded by an ad blitz to explain the technology to consumers.

"Marketing to the consumer is a big challenge," he said.

Backed by the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem, Ultra Violet is under a lot of pressure from the industry to succeed where music DRM efforts failed. The program is being counted on to help bring consumers back to physical media, which has seen a massive erosion of revenue.

More movies are set for release within the UV program, and Warner Bros. said it will make more than half its catalog available by the end of the year. TV episodes also are included in the UV plan.

UltraViolet will roll out next to the U.K. and then Canada.

For more:
- see this article

Related articles:
Neustar wraps up UltraViolet digital locker
UltraViolet digital locker gets nod from six studios
DECE unveils 'UltraViolet' digital-rights locker

Suggested Articles

Hulu is expanding device compatibility for its 4K streaming video to Xbox One devices starting today.

Comcast last Friday moved Turner Classic Movies to its Sports Entertainment add-on package, a move that angered several subscribers.

With the streaming wars intensifying, the “aggregation wars” are poised for greater activity as well: everyone wants a piece of this pie.