Google building streaming video aggregation feature for Chrome

News of Google’s potential release of a video aggregation hub for Chrome comes as the company is working to solidify its position in the streaming TV space. (Chrome Story)

Google is reportedly building a streaming video service aggregation feature – dubbed Kaleidoscope – within its Chrome web browser.

Chrome Story spotted the feature – which is not yet available – within the Canary version of Chrome for developers. The publication’s screenshots suggest that Kaleidoscope is designed to unify access for different streaming services including Amazon Prime Video, Disney+ and Netflix.

“You can see all your shows in one place, no matter where they’re hosted,” reads one of the pages.

The feature appears to still be in the internal testing phase and it’s unclear when or if it will become available for consumers.

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News of Google’s potential release of a video aggregation hub for Chrome comes as the company is working to solidify its position in the streaming TV space.

Earlier this year, the company revealed a new advertising program that will help marketers target viewers watching YouTube or YouTube TV on TV screens. YouTube Select will grow the amount of available upfront ad inventory on YouTube by bringing new channels into the Google Preferred program and, according to Ad Exchanger, it will make it easier purchase ads on YouTube TV and YouTube on TV screens through “Streaming Lineups,” which can be bought in the upfront or programmatically instead of through Google Ads.

Google may also be planning a new connected TV streaming device.

XDA Developers recently unearthed some new details and images for Google’s rumored Android TV-based streaming device and the product – codenamed “Sabrina” – could be better positioned to compete with the biggest streaming device makers. The potential successor to Chromecast Ultra, which might be sold under Google’s Nest brand name, may include improvements like the Android TV platform and a dedicated voice remote.

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