SMPTE’s new tech specs aiming for interoperability in video

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"IMF Application DPP (ProRes)” is the first of SMPTE’s new TSPs series, which the group hopes will help produce public delivery documents, constrain standards, and foster new workflows. (iStock)

The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) will begin rolling out a new series of technical specifications geared toward promoting interoperability.

The first tech spec, titled "IMF Application DPP (ProRes),” was proposed by the Digital Production Partnership (DPP) to build upon the existing Interoperable Master Format (IMF) standard developed and published by SMPTE.

"The global market for quality content has brought enormous opportunity for media organizations by creating demand for different versions of master material. That opportunity brings with it great complexity," said DPP Managing Director Mark Harrison in a statement. "That's the issue that 'IMF Application DPP (ProRes)' solves: it enables faster, less expensive, and higher quality versioning for specific broadcast and online applications, along with financial and operational benefits brought by reduced storage and improved flexibility and tracking."

The DPP worked with the European Broadcasting Union, North American Broadcasters Association, and the IMF User Group to create the specification. The DPP is compliance-testing the spec now.

RELATED: SMPTE approves first ST 2110 standards for IP networks

It’s the first of SMPTE’s new TSPs series, which the group hopes will help produce public delivery documents, constrain standards, and foster new workflows that are aimed at long-term interoperability.

"Specifications are a part of SMPTE's future," said SMPTE Standards Vice President Bruce Devlin in a statement. "With 'IMF Application DPP (ProRes),' we are beginning a new chapter in SMPTE's activities to encourage global interoperability and to foster the emergence of new and stable technologies."

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