AT&T says FCC is not following its own 25 Mbps broadband definition

AT&T (NYSE: T) has criticized the FCC's new Broadband Progress report, noting that the agency is not following its own re-definition of broadband, which is set at a minimum download speed of 25 Mbps. 

Upon releasing its 2015 Broadband Progress Report, the FCC voted during its monthly meeting in January 2015 to change the definition of broadband from a minimum of 4/1 Mbps to 25/3 Mbps, a move that will force incumbent telcos and cable operators to rethink how they market and deliver services to consumers and businesses.

"It's bad enough the FCC keeps moving the goal posts on their definition of broadband, apparently so they can continue to justify intervening in obviously competitive markets," said Jim Cicconi, senior EVP for external and legislative affairs for AT&T, in a blog post. "But now they are even ignoring their own definition in order to pad their list of accomplishments."

FierceTelecom has a full report on Cicconi's comments here. 

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