Cablevision's unionized Brooklyn workers approve collective bargaining agreement

Approximately 260 Brooklyn-based Cablevision employees represented by the Communications Workers of America have voted to ratify a collective bargaining agreement with Cablevision (NYSE: CVC), ending a nasty three-year labor battle.

In a statement released Sunday, Feb. 15 touting the two-year agreement, the CWA says it received "substantial wage increases" that bring the Brooklyn workers to within 96 percent of wage parity with Cablevision's other 14,000 employees.

The Brooklyn workers can't be disciplined or fired without "just cause," and they will receive the same 401(k) retirement benefits as other Cablevision worker.

For its part, Cablevision notes that its other 14,000 workers will not be represented by the union.

"Our members stuck together for 3 years and in the end, persuaded Cablevision that a fair deal acceptable to management and labor was possible," said Chris Shelton, national VP for CWA District One.

"We are glad to have these contentious negotiations behind us, and now we look forward to our employees continued efforts to provide the best connectivity and service to Cablevision's Brooklyn customers," added a Cablevision statement.

Cablevision has been at odds with its Brooklyn tech workers since they voted to unionize themselves in 2012. 

For more:
- read this CWA press release

Related links:
Cablevision signs collective bargaining agreement with Brooklyn tech workers
Cablevision accuses NYC Mayor and CWA of 'scheming' in secret meeting
Cablevision CEO James Dolan fights big labor in NYC … as pro-union mayor takes over Big Apple
Cablevision's Dolan accused of union-busting by NLRB

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